Understanding the History of Kashmir, Art. 370, and Speculating on the Future

Srinath Raghavan
Issue: November 1, 2019

Srinath Raghavan is Professor of International Relations and History at Ashoka University.

View of Srinagar and Dal Lake | Kenny (Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 3.0)

At the Manthan Samvaad in Hyderabad on October 2, Srinath Raghavan gave a lucid exposition of the troubled history of Kashmir, presented the facts since 1947 and cleared the fog around Article 370. Watch this excellent talk here. (Courtesy Manthan)

 

The video is presented here courtesy Manthan.

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